Into the Brexit minefield

We are now entering a potentially dangerous phase of the Brexit process. Some Westminster politicians seem to think that the hard work is now over, given the epic struggles of 2017. 

In fact, we have merely left the rocky terrain and are now entering the minefield. 

Monsieur Barnier has repeatedly told us that the choice for the UK is between a Free Trade Agreement model (perhaps like CETA) or a Single Market-style relationship like Norway or Iceland

Either alternative has pros and cons for the UK.

The FTA approach would give the UK back more sovereignty (at least on paper) but would leave us a rule-taker in many ways, following rules and regulations ‘faxed’ from Brussels when trading with our largest trading partner (and many other countries which are emulating their rules willingly or unwillingly).

In addition, this approach would mean we would have to strike new deals with the EU and its member states about the rights of UK citizens to live, work, study and retire in the EU (and vice versa).  Continue reading Into the Brexit minefield

Response to Bloomberg

Today, an article appeared on the Bloomberg website discussing their predictions for Brexit talks in the year ahead. Several interesting scenarios are discussed, with some possibilities more likely than others.

In one scenario:

“it proves impossible for May to satisfy her three most difficult audiences: the Irish government, which is backed by the EU; the Democratic Unionist Party, which is propping up her government; and the ardent Brexit-backers within her own party.”  Continue reading Response to Bloomberg