Tag Archives: EEA

Debating the EEA

Tonight in the House of Commons there was a debate on Brexit, the EEA (European Economic Area) and EFTA (European Free Trade Association). Watch HERE.

The debate was organised by Stephen Kinnock MP. 

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BREXIT – The Truth Dawns

This might be the most important post about Brexit that you read this year. Please share it once you have read it. 

Disclaimer: In this post, we are going to exclusively talk about observable, verifiable facts. We will provide links.

Where something in this article is just our belief or opinion we will try to specify that clearly. If you see something incorrect contact us and we will be happy to change it.

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This week, Theresa Mary May MP, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is due to make a speech in Florence

Continue reading BREXIT – The Truth Dawns

Can migration be controlled inside the EEA?

Today, in response to the announcement by Labour’s Keir Starmer about the possibility of the UK remaining in the EEA after Brexit; Labour Member of Parliament for Aberavon Stephen Kinnock tweeted the below message:

 

In non-twitter speak:

“Keir Starmer calls for a settlement on immigration. Article 112 of the European Economic Area (EEA) agreement allows for a quota-based immigration system.”  Continue reading Can migration be controlled inside the EEA?

Brexit, EFTA and Mrs Thatcher

Would Mrs Thatcher have backed Brexit?

During the course of the EU referendum campaign, both sides have claimed that the former British Prime Minister, the late Baroness Margaret Thatcher would have supported their campaign.

The ‘Remain’ campaign say that it is clear that Mrs Thatcher would be pro-remain. They cite three main points – firstly, that Mrs Thatcher campaigned on the ‘remain’ side in the EEC referendum of 1975.

Secondly, that while in office, Mrs Thatcher signed the Single European act, a treaty that substantially moved forward the process of European integration and regulation.

Thirdly, they say that if alive today the former Prime Minister would have made a hard-headed decision to remain based on trade and other economic factors.

In this short essay we will attempt to address each of these issues and detail, with annotations and citations why we believe beyond doubt that Mrs Thatcher would not only would vote for Brexit today, but would be actively campaigning for it.

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Changing views

Mrs Thatcher’s views on ‘Europe’ (by which we mean the EC, EEC and later the EU) can be described in terms of four broad phases:

Phase one – her views before she became Prime Minister, Phase two – her views on Europe during the height of her powers as Prime Minister, phase three – her views towards the end of her premiership; finally, her views after the EEC became the EU after the Maastricht Treaty was enacted.  Continue reading Brexit, EFTA and Mrs Thatcher

Migration and the EEA – an analysis

By Simon Barnett, guest blogger

As a small child, so small I no longer remember the specifics of the question, I asked my father about immigration. While I can no longer recall the question, his answer will remain with me forever.

“Anyone who wants to come and work, pay taxes and raise their children is as British as you or I.”

And that small child grew up into the sort of person who knows the SECOND verse of the Marseilles. The sort who secretly listens to French pop music. The type of person who always has enough Euros in his wallet to grab a pack of Galois, an expresso and a copy of the IHT wherever he has ended up. And the where has included living and working across Europe and beyond. Therefore, the principle of free movement of workers – if not the implementation – is something for which I am passionate advocate.

Consequently, people are often surprised by my opposition to the EU. “But you love Europe”, they exclaim. “It will still be there after we leave the EU”, I respond.

Effectively there are two clubs that can play in the single market I explain. The European Union is the club for countries that plan to federate.

The European Free Trade Association is the trade bloc-alternative for European states who are unwilling to join the federation.

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If we do not plan to federate I argue, we should be in the latter.

Continue reading Migration and the EEA – an analysis